Guindulman.org http://guindulman.org Sat, 05 Nov 2016 13:36:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 http://guindulman.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/cropped-images-32x32.png Guindulman.org http://guindulman.org 32 32 #WalangPasok: Class suspensions, Wednesday, November 2 http://guindulman.org/walangpasok-class-suspensions-wednesday-november-2/ Tue, 01 Nov 2016 23:16:05 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=841



MANILA, Philippines – The long Undas weekend will end on All Saints’ Day on November 1, a special non-working day, but some local governments and schools have suspended work and classes on Wednesday, November 2, to allow students and employees to spend more time with their loved ones.

When it released the list of holidays for 2016 last year, Malacañang marked October 31, Monday, as an additional special non-working day – especially for those traveling to the provinces to observe the annual tradition.

Here are the local governments and schools that have declared work and class suspensions on November 2, All Souls’ Day.

Local governments

Toledo, Cebu
Province of Misamis Occidental
Ilagan, Isabela
Institutions

Ateneo de Manila University (Quezon City campus only) – all levels (offices will resume Wednesday, November 2; classes on Thursday, November 3). The Ateneo Professional Schools, meanwhile, will resume work and classes on Wednesday.
De La Salle University-Manila – all levels
De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde – all levels
University of Santo Tomas – all levels (classes will resume on Friday, November 4)
St Paul University – Manila – all levels
Technological Institute of the Philippines (offices will resume Wednesday, November 2; classes on Thursday, November 3)
St Louis University – all levels

 

Source: Rappler.com

]]>
Customs and Traditions http://guindulman.org/customs-and-traditions/ http://guindulman.org/customs-and-traditions/#comments Thu, 27 Oct 2016 23:04:35 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=100 The Philippine culture is rich in customs and traditions. Philippines culture reflects the complexity of the history of the Philippines through the combination of cultures of foreign influences. Spanish colonization of the Philippines lasted for more than three centuries. There is a significant amount of Spanish-Mexican influence within Filipino culture, customs and traditions. Hispanic influences are visible in traditional Philippine folk music, folk dance, language, food, art, and religion.

  • People in this town are generally helpful. When a member of a family dies, the people in the neighborhood readily give their assistance in form of “tampohay” the local term for contribution in order to help, a little if not much, the financial problems of the bereaved family.
  • The people celebrate two fiestas in a year; one for the town and the other for their own barrio. They spend much money not only during fiestas but also during wedding, baptism, an burial rites.
  • The people of this town are also very hospitable. They used to entertain their visitors well. Even if they have only a little to offer or to server, they try their best to satisfy their visitors without thinking of the financial problem that lie ahead.
  • Our young ladies are very shy when it comes to courtship. They tend to shy away from strangers even though their hearts tell them that they are the right lovers. On the other hand, young men have also hard time in expressing their feelings towards the young ladies. Their shyness has been added by their parents’ strict rules concerning courtship
  • When one dies in the family, it has been the custom of our place that the bereaved family will have to schedule a forty-day prayer subdivided into four known “novena’ of different intentions, the first nine days of which are devoted to the prayers of the holy rosary. Prayers, therefore, are done every night for forty nights. Then, a closing prayer on the fortieth day has to be said locally termed as “pabasa” which perhaps includes a sort of thanksgiving to the neighbors and friends who joined with the in the hour and days of their sorrows and mourning.
]]>
http://guindulman.org/customs-and-traditions/feed/ 1
Beliefs and Superstition http://guindulman.org/beliefs-and-superstition/ Thu, 27 Oct 2016 22:40:45 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=94 Beliefs and superstition have grown in number throughout the various places. These beliefs have come from the different saying and superstitions of our ancestors that aim to prevent danger from happening or to make a person refrain from doing something in particular. These beliefs are part of our culture, for one derives their beliefs from the influences of what their customs, traditions and culture have dictated to explain certain phenomena or to put a scare in people. Some are practiced primarily because we believe that there is nothing to lose if they will comply with these beliefs. The following are some of the different superstitions.

  • Fishing
    Before the fish net is thrown into the sea, a glowing charcoal is placed in a container with some medicinal ingredients set over the burning coal to form a thick smoke. Then the fish net is suddenly lifted above the smoke with accompanying prayers being recited preferably “Apostles’ Creed”. It is believed that fish are attracted to the net thus ensuring a good catch.
  • Marriage
    1. Brides shouldn’t try on their wedding dress before the wedding day or the wedding will not push through.
    2. The one holding the candle whose light will be put out first is believed to die ahead of his/her partner.
    3. The bride or groom secretly tries to step on his/her partner’s foot so that she/he will not experience ill-treatment during their married life.
    4. Upon arrival at the house where the reception is to be held, rice grains are showered unto the couple at the doorway to wish them a life of plenty. This is followed by the combing of their hair of both parties, the bride and groom, to signify peace and harmony. Then the couple are made to drink water from the same glass with the belief that they will remain cool whenever disagreements arise.
  • Child bearing
    1. A pregnant woman is never allowed to go out during evenings without a piece of cloth or “bandana” to cover her head for fear of evil spirits who might happen to smell the fetus inside her womb.
    2. When a woman labors, she is made the “monkeys’ belt” to ensure fast and easy delivery of the baby.
  • Death
    1. When a dead person is still lying in state in the house, sweeping of the floor is not to be allowed. The dirt of any kind including pieces of paper are just picked up and gathered in the corner. This is done so as not to drive away spirit of the dead person.
    2. When the coffin is to be brought down from the house for final church services, the coffin is lifted up to the level off the shoulders of the men carrying it for the members of the family to pass under the coffin. This is done so that the spirit of the dead will not come back any more to get/invite any of the members of the family to die with him/her.
  • Building a house
    1. A first post is to be erected at early dawn to insure peace among the members of the household.
    2. Pieces of coins are buried underneath the post to insure a life of plenty.
    3. When a family transfers to a new house, it is done at early dawn to have peace in the house all the time.
]]>
Surprising Benefits of Coconut Embryo http://guindulman.org/surprising-benefits-of-coconut-embryo/ Mon, 17 Oct 2016 23:07:29 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=87 The mature coconuts are collected regularly for their milk. Usually you cracked coconut for lunch (stewed vegetables), but sometimes there was a strange formation inside. Apparently, this coconut was ready to shoot some leaves out, and this thing is called buwa or botbot (Bisaya)– is an edible, soft predecessor.

Top 10 Health Benefits of Coconut Embryo

1.Supports immune system health: it is anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-parasite.
2.Provides a natural source of quick energy and enhances physical and athletic performance.
3. Improves digestion and absorption of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals
4. Improves insulin secretion and symptoms associated with diabetes.
5. Helps protect the body from cancers due to insulin reduction, removal of free radicals that cause premature aging and degenerative disease.
6. Reduces risk of heart health and improves good cholesterol (HDL).
7. Restores and supports thyroid function.
8. Helps protect against kidney disease and bladder infection.
9. Promotes weight loss.
10. Helps keep hair and skin healthy and youthful looking, prevents wrinkles, sagging skin, age spots, and provides sun protection

Do you find this article informative? If you do, you can also share this with your friends and family online. For more healthy tips, feel free to visit our website more often and don’t forget to leave your comment.

]]>
Truth Exposed! Deadline Tomorrow’ Posts Fill Facebook’s News feed http://guindulman.org/facebook-hoax/ Mon, 17 Oct 2016 16:08:56 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=65 Deadline Tomorrow posts have been circulating for several days already.

DEADLINE TOMORROW – The news feed of Facebook has recently been bombarded by status stating netizens’ expression of not giving permission to the social media or anyone to use their personal information. These past few days, scrolling the news feed of Facebook will make you encounter a lot of status containing almost the same contentions. The netizens have been sharing these as they believe in got giving anyone permission to use their pictures, messages, posts, or any personal information. These have bombarded the social media giant for days but still, undeniably, there is no privacy policy change in Facebook yet. A recent news report stated some factors related to the said matter. It mentioned that this is not the first time that a certain rumor on policy change has circulated rampantly in Facebook.

]]>
The New Road Numbering System http://guindulman.org/the-new-road-numbering-system/ Wed, 12 Oct 2016 22:32:13 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=40 You might have noticed these newly-installed posts bearing the number “850” along the national road. The number indicated actually refers to a specific route number based on the new route numbering system being implemented by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) throughout the country.In the province of Bohol, these specific routes are numbered 850, 851, 852, 853 and 854.

Trinidad – Clarin – Tagbilaran – Loay (850)
Trinidad – Carmen – Ubay (850)
Trinidad – Carmen – Loay (852)

Here is the map for your reference.

road-numbering-system

Source: http://www.dpwh.gov.ph

Route numbering is easy to remember because many road names are usually changed in honor of a person or event of historical importance of a locality.

 

 

]]>
Folklore http://guindulman.org/folklore/ Mon, 10 Oct 2016 14:51:29 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=31 Beliefs

  • Fishing
    Before the fish net is thrown into the sea, a glowing charcoal is placed in a container with some medicinal ingredients set over the burning coal to form a thick smoke. Then the fish net is suddenly lifted above the smoke with accompanying prayers being recited preferably “Apostles’ Creed”. It is believed that fish are attracted to the net thus ensuring a good catch.
  • Marriage
    1. The bridal gown and suit of the groom should not be tried on prior to the wedding day for it is believed to bring back luck for the couple.
    2. The one holding the candle whose light will be put out first is believed to die ahead of his/her partner.
    3. The bride or groom secretly tries to step on his/her partner’s foot so that she/he will not experience ill-treatment during their married life.
    4. Upon arrival at the house where the reception is to be held, rice grains are showered unto the couple at the doorway to wish them a life of plenty. This is followed by the combing of their hair of both parties, the bride and groom, to signify peace and harmony. Then the couple are made to drink water from the same glass with the belief that they will remain cool whenever disagreements arise.
  • Child bearing
    1. A pregnant woman is never allowed to go out during evenings without a piece of cloth or “bandana” to cover her head for fear of evil spirits who might happen to smell the fetus inside her womb.
    2. When a woman labors, she is made the “monkeys’ belt” to ensure fast and easy delivery of the baby.
  • Death
    1. When a dead person is still lying in state in the house, sweeping of the floor is not to be allowed. The dirt of any kind including pieces of paper are just picked up and gathered in the corner. This is done so as not to drive away spirit of the dead person.
    2. When the coffin is to be brought down from the house for final church services, the coffin is lifted up to the level off the shoulders of the men carrying it for the members of the family to pass under the coffin. This is done so that the spirit of the dead will not come back any more to get/invite any of the members of the family to die with him/her.
  • Building a house
    1. A first post is to be erected at early dawn to insure peace among the members of the household.
    2. Pieces of coins are buried underneath the post to insure a life of plenty.
    3. When a family transfers to a new house, it is done at early dawn to have peace in the house all the time.

Customs

  • People in this town are generally helpful. When a member of a family dies, the people in the neighborhood readily give their assistance in form of “tampohay” the local term for contribution in order to help, a little if not much, the financial problems of the bereaved family.
  • The people celebrate two fiestas in a year; one for the town and the other for their own barrio. They spend much money not only during fiestas but also during wedding, baptism, an burial rites.
  • The people of this town are also very hospitable. They used to entertain their visitors well. Even if they have only a little to offer or to server, they try their best to satisfy their visitors without thinking of the financial problem that lie ahead.
  • Our young ladies are very shy when it comes to courtship. They tend to shy away from strangers even though their hearts tell them that they are the right lovers. On the other hand, young men have also hard time in expressing their feelings towards the young ladies. Their shyness has been added by their parents’ strict rules concerning courtship
  • When one dies in the family, it has been the custom of our place that the bereaved family will have to schedule a forty-day prayer subdivided into four known “novena’ of different intentions, the first nine days of which are devoted to the prayers of the holy rosary. Prayers, therefore, are done every night for forty nights. Then, a closing prayer on the fortieth day has to be said locally termed as “pabasa” which perhaps includes a sort of thanksgiving to the neighbors and friends who joined with the in the hour and days of their sorrows and mourning.

Proverbs

  • The one who cackles is the one who lays eggs.
  • Rolling stone gathers no moss.
  • Early bird catches more worms
  • Good fortune knocks at your door but once.
  • A friend’s slap is better than an enemy’s kiss.
  • A guava tree will not bear mango fruit
  • Earth has ears, gossip has wings.
  • Blood is thicker than water.
  • Smile is the key to every door.
  • What is yours is mine. (Unsay imo maoy ako.)
  • A barking dog seldom bites.
  • Hide your tears behind your sweet smile.
]]>
The Hymn http://guindulman.org/the-hymn/ Mon, 10 Oct 2016 14:11:42 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=29 Guindulman Hymn

Dear Guindulman dreaming by the bay
Oh my birth land sparkling by the sea
Your mountains blue and valleys green
Twin rivers since the start have been embracing you

Sweet Guindulman kissed by waves from far
Each night you’re watched by distant stars
Your sons all brave your maidens true
Invaders thrice did come and thrice we fought for your

The hardships of your lonely past
Are weary marks upon our brow
But sunrise beams a silver cast
Of dreams and hopes that glow

Our dear mother on your altar reigns
Our light and guide through all the years
Through wars and strife whatever fate may bring
Oh lovely land Will stand by you

]]>
The Seal http://guindulman.org/the-seal/ Mon, 10 Oct 2016 13:59:07 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=26 The Municipal Seal of Guindulman

Guindulman Official Seal

Guindulman Official Seal

It was during the 24th World Congress of International Union of Local Executives at PICC when the logo of every municipality was proposed by a study committee chaired by then Mayor Lilio L. Amora. The delegates were exhorted to make a design that would embody the ideals, history and virtue of the townspeople as a rallying point for the present generation until the far distant future.

In his mind he tried to imagine Guindulman and reflected on the events told by his parents and old folk during his childhood. Foremost in his mind were the two massive churches built by the Spaniards. Secondly, he recalled the history of the battles fought by the Guindulmanons against the Spanish conquistadores, the ambush of Cabantian Pass and the burning of Guindulman during the American and Japanese invasion and, finally, the famous guerilla warfare during the Japanese occupation.

As to the virtue of the Guindulmanon Mayor Amora thought of the close and strong family ties that has created and impression all over the world by the Filipinos in general.

In his design the Triune God is seen in a very prominent place as a symbol of the piousness of the Guindulmanon. The Philippine flag symbolizing the fierce and valiant patriotism of the Guindulmanon and then Family which I the strongest chain in the community.

Encircling the design are 19 blades representing the 19 barangay. The blade is chosen because it represents most agricultural town. It also represents the weapon that has resisted all forms of invasion.

The inner circle which is a rope reminds us of the tie that bound our forefathers during the Spanish conquest; the second rope was during the American invasion; and third rope during the Japanese occupation. These events are summarized in our hymn, quote:

“Invaders thrice did come and thrice we fought for you…”

The design was converted into a seal and was approved by the Municipal Development Council as the seal of Guindulman. Later on it was adopted by the ILAW International since Guindulman was its first area of coverage. The seal was converted into a Municipal Color and was flown or displayed in all provincial activities wherein Guindulman was a participating unit.

]]>
The Origin http://guindulman.org/the-origin/ Mon, 10 Oct 2016 13:35:28 +0000 http://guindulman.org/?p=19 Guindulman in Perspective – The Origin

In the olden days, names of certain places were sometimes ascribed to some usual or common incidents or occurrences as the case of the town of Guindulman. The place was originally called “Guinduluman” hatched from a vernacular expression which means “something or somebody who is overtaken by darkness”

There is no official record to show how the town really got its name. However, the legend reveals that during the early part of the Spanish era in the Philippines, there were only two formally organized towns along the southeastern and eastern coastal boarders of Bohol, namely, Jagna and Butuanan which is now renamed Alicia. Being the only towns in those good old days, traders and even ordinary residents from each of these two places used to travel on foot either to Jagna or to Butuanan to transact business. Owing to the distance, travelers starting from either these towns in early morning were surely to be benighted or overtaken by darkness right in the specific place; hence the name “guinduluman”. However, because of the carefree attitude of the early inhabitants and the absence of official records, the name “Guinduluman” was later changed to the present name Guindulman. It is only regrettable to note that to note that nobody in the locality could ascertain the approximate date of its change. After all, the actual meaning of the given name does not alter.

It is even further said that the early condition of the area, itself, had something to contribute to the appropriateness of the term because the center of the town was once surrounded and almost entirely shaded by a dense forest which also made the town dark even during daytime. Travelers from other places passing through this thick forest could clearly observe its surrounding darkness because the sunlight could hardly penetrate through the thick foliage, thus causing darkness in the area at any time of the day. Such actual condition of the particular place, therefore, gave added significance to the created name. It should be noted that the term Guindulman is actually derived from the root word “dulom” or “du’om” in short which means dark.

]]>